Regreso al Amor II

“The moon was huge and blood-red as I drove home from tango, doing about 60 on the long deserted down-slope of the Stono River bridge onto Johns Island. I was thinking about tango and its hypnotic allure when I noticed flashing blue lights far behind me. I touched the brakes, better to be safe than sorry; whoever was being pulled over was shocked right now, and there but for the grace of God went I. Astor Piazzolla’s rhythmic paean to lost love was on the radio, and I turned it up. Next thing I knew, a police car was on my tail, his lights in my face, his siren whooping urgently. I pulled over, shocked, trying not to swerve too zealously, recalling a glass of wine I’d had earlier. I rolled down the windows and breathed deeply to dissipate any lingering aromas. The engine ticked, mosquitoes buzzed, and a barred owl called from the woods.

“The cruiser’s door swung open, and an officer loomed in my rear-view, a foot-long flashlight in her hand. She glanced at me and swiveled her torch across the back seat. I thought of the lovely doe-eyed attendant on my flight into Beirut.

“Good evening, Officer.”

She returned my smile, briefly. “Do you know you were doing 60 in a 45?”

“Surely not. I’m sorry. I wanted to get home before midnight.”

“My name’s not Shirley.” She regarded me levelly. “License and registration please.”

I rummaged around the glove-box. “I’m coming home from an Argentine Tango class at the University, every Tuesday night, very beguiling. Have you ever thought about Tango, Ma’am?”

She may have rolled her eyes, but the note of asperity in her voice was unmistakable. “Not that I remember. I’ll be back in a minute.”

“I closed the windows and sat tight, listening to “Regreso al Amor” and reflecting on the injustice of a ticket for a little speed on an empty highway in the middle of nowhere. I must have dozed off momentarily, for her tap on the window startled me, pasting a guilty look onto my face. She gave me a pale blue warning slip, told me to slow down, and smiled, briefly. I thanked her and thought how a civil society is essentially just, and how as always luck was on my side.”

“On the last moonlit stretch of River Road, almost home, doing about 40, I suddenly registered a full-grown deer trotting across the road directly in front of me. I stood on the brakes. The impact was solid and irrevocable and hurled the animal into a ballistic trajectory that spanned the divide between life and death. I stopped. The blameless deer lay broken in the glare of the high beams, its head still reaching for the safety of the dark woods where the barred owl called. I flipped on the emergency lights, and as in a dream, I stepped out of the car and approached the vivid still-life splayed on the asphalt. Piazzolla’s insistent cello and double bass fugue became a dirge as I dragged the creature by its warm velvet feet onto the grass verge. The celebration of life evoked by Tango seemed impotent and irrelevant in the face of instant death. And yet the music’s tendrils weaved their way into my stunned heart, freighting the moment with gravity and remorse, but also kindling a redemptive spark of solace…”

Story posted by: Adam Smolka

About the author: Writer from Charleston

Published: 12 Aug 2019 @ 01:53

Last modified: 13 Aug 2019 @ 01:16

Comments (0)

Regreso al Amor II
Submit comment

Recent stories

Share news or videos. Write reviews, interviews and essays. Blog about anything and everything ‘tango’. Find the ‘Stories’ tab in the main menu and choose ‘Post a story’ to start.

Explore stories
Story
If you come to Valencia and dance Tango, don’t leave without visiting the milonga http://tangoenvale…
Reviews | Paco Castellano | 01.12.22
Story
As an organiser of milongas, and a lover of science, I collect a lot of field research data on the g…
Essays & Opinions | Martin van Kesteren | 14.10.22
Story
Strictly Come Dancing star, Vincent Simone and Argentine Tango specialist, Paula Duarte, return to t…
Event News | Rita Maree Horne | 27.08.22